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Is Intel SSD Firmware Recovery Possible with a Linux OS?

March 22nd, 2015 No comments


Linux OS for Intel ssd firmware recovery

If your solid state drive has become inaccessible due to the dreaded 8MB bug retrieving your lost files on your own is very unlikely. However, you can still perform Intel SSD Firmware Recovery to restore your drive to its factory settings so that you can use it again. The solution below is for those using Linux.


  • Key in and enter the command “sudo apt-get install hdparm” followed by sudo hdparm -I /dev/sdX in which “X” stands for the drive number of your SSD in the system. The command will display some details regarding your solid state drive. Check the serial number and if it has been changed into “BAD_CTX 00000150” then your SSD has really been affected by the firmware bug.
  • Continue reading the details about your drive until you reach the security section. If that section states that your drive is active, you can proceed to the next step. However, if it states “frozen you can’t continue”, you first need to unfreeze your drive before you can move on. There are two ways to life the freeze. First, put the system to sleep then wake it up. If this does now work, quickly unplug and re-plug the data cable of your SSD.
  • You need to set a password before you can restore your drive to its factory settings. To do so, key in the command “sudo hdparm –user-master u –security-set-pass PASSWORD /dev/sdX”. Once more, the “X” stands for your SSD while “PASSWORD” stands for whatever password you chose.
  • You can now initiate restoration of the SSD by keying in the command “sudo hdparm –user-master u –security-erase PASSWORD /dev/sdX”. This will perform a quick format on the drive that will take just a few minutes.





Use the “sudo hdparm -I /dev/sdX” to check the drive details again. If the drive size and serial number are now correct, restoration is finished. If not, perform a full format with command “sudo hdparm –user-master u –security-erase-enhanced SOMEPASS /dev/sdX”. A full format may take up to an hour to complete. Then issue the “sudo hdparm -I /dev/sdX” command again and everything should be in order.


If you want to recover your files, leave your SSD untouched and send it to 300 Dollar Data Recovery. Brian Cometa and the other technicians of the company can get your data back for just $300.


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Press Release: DriveFish Acquired by $300 Data Recovery

April 1st, 2014 No comments

PRESS RELEASE: $300 Data Recovery acquires DriveFish Data Recovery; $300 Data Recovery becomes the largest affordable data recovery provider in the United States.

A recent merger of the two largest “affordable” data recovery companies now makes $300 Data Recovery the largest provider of low-cost data recovery services in the United States. Before $300 Data Recovery and DriveFish Data Recovery, the only options for data recovery started at $800 and went up to $2500 or more. This left a gap in the marketplace for economical data recovery. In 2007, $300 Data Recovery & DriveFish Data Recovery, unbeknownst to each other, recognized this demand and created a new niche: “affordable” data recovery.

In March of 2014, $300 Data Recovery received a phone call from Baird Castleberry, co-owner of DriveFish Data Recovery (www.drivefish.com). He was interested in selling DriveFish in order to dedicate more time to his other ventures. But he was very concerned with selling DriveFish to the right kind of data recovery company. He specifically reached out to $300 Data Recovery first, because like DriveFish, they have outstanding customer service and integrity, while maintaining an affordable flat-fee pricing structure and money-back guarantee. They don’t run a bait-and-switch scam like many other data recovery companies who advertise low rates only to charge more in the end, nor are they a “big box” data recovery company charging thousands of dollars for basic data recovery services.

$300 Data Recovery jumped at the opportunity to take over DriveFish’s good name, and DriveFish’s customers couldn’t be happier! Not only is $300 Data Recovery’s rate cheaper for most hard drives, but their abilities far exceed what was previously possible at DriveFish. This is because, unlike DriveFish, $300 Data Recovery are experts at firmware corruption repair (“firmware corruption” accounts for around 30% all hard drive failures/problems), they use a clean room/chamber to perform some “Level-3” hard drive repairs, and utilize the leading hard drive cloning tools (with the most advanced products from Deepspar and AceLabs). Like DriveFish, they also perform chip-level PCB repairs and have immense experience recovering data from hard drives and RAIDs with logical (“file system”) damage.

Brian Cometa, owner of $300 Data Recovery, commented, “we can’t thank DriveFish enough for giving us the opportunity to extend our low-cost data recovery services to their customers.” $300 Data Recovery has also incorporated DriveFish’s slogan, “File recovery for the people,” which has been added to a number of other rotating slogans on the front page of $300 Data Recovery’s website: www.300dollardatarecovery.com.


About $300 Data Recovery
$300 Data Recovery is the largest company in the United States to provide affordable professional-level data recovery services. $300 Data Recovery continues to distinguish themselves from all other data recovery companies with hundreds of 5-star ratings from their customers on websites like Yelp and Google+. With a $300 flat-fee for most failed hard drives, no diagnostic or attempt fees, and a unique “only pay if we recovered data you want back” policy, $300 Data Recovery offers an attractive alternative to ultra-expensive data recovery companies.

$300 Data Recovery: http://www.300dollardatarecovery.com
Yelp: http://www.yelp.com/biz/300-data-recovery-studio-city
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+300dollardatarecovery/about
FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/300dollardatarecovery
Twitter: https://twitter.com/300datarecovery

$300 Data Recovery
11390 Ventura Blvd Ste 5
Studio City, CA 91604
United States
323-230-0622

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Happy New Year from DriveFish

January 2nd, 2014 No comments

DriveFish Data Recovery wishes everyone out there had a fantastic holidays season. We hope everyone had a great time with their friends and family, and once everything gets back in the swing of business for you, DriveFish is here for any of your data recovery needs or questions you might have about backup solutions and data loss prevention.

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Giving Thanks to the Data Recovery World

November 26th, 2013 No comments

DriveFish Data Recovery would like to extend our thanks to everyone out there who has contacted us or used our services for data recovery. Nothing makes us happier than hearing an excited customer’s voice after we tell them we’ve recovered their data. While this makes our day, we hope it’s a position you never have to find yourself in. You can read elsewhere on our blog about ways to prevent data loss. But if you ever do need our services, we’d love to hear you say “Thank you” after we get your data recovered!

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Don’t ‘Fall’ Into Data Recovery Traps

September 15th, 2013 No comments

Autumn has come and the leaves are changing, but don’t let the changing seasons leave you bare as the trees without a data recovery plan. As anyone who has read our blog in the past knows, we always encourage keeping recent backups of your data. Of course this doesn’t always happen as planned, and we understand this is when people need us. If you find yourself in a situation where you need data recovered, or if you have any questions about how to prevent data loss such as online backup plans or RAID solutions, don’t hesitate to contact DriveFish Data Recovery today!

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1 TB Flash Drive To Be Available Soon

January 7th, 2013 No comments

Later in this first quarter of 2013, Kingston claims they will have a 1 TB flash drive available to the market. This is a vast jump up in capacity for flash media. Known as the DataTraveler HyperX Predator, the drive communicates with USB 3.0 and promises read speeds of up to 240MB/s and write speeds of up to 160MB/s. This is incredibly fast compared to historic flash media speeds!

Of course, you will have to pay a pretty penny to get your hands on one of these HyperX Predators. The currently available 512GB model is $1750, so if you want to be one of the first in line to get the 1TB model, get ready to break open your wallet. Of course, if you’re willing to wait a little while these will come down in price. Who knows, by later in the year there will probably be a 2TB available!

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Redundant Array of What Disks?!

December 4th, 2012 No comments

We are thankful to have discerning readers looking at our blog posts, and one of these readers commented on a recent post we did about RAID setups. In this article, we discussed how RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent Disks. This is true, though originally the acronym stood for Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks, as our reader pointed out. More often now the “I” stands for “Independent”.

Either acronym can be misleading depending on the setup. Some RAID setups can use quality (read: not inexpensive) disks, and some RAIDs are actually set up so the multiple disks require each other to function, meaning they are not completely independent. For example, in a RAID 0 setup the data is split between disks, making it not entirely redundant (or independent for that matter). These setups are used more for performance, while setups like RAID 1 have mirror images on each disk, so they are actually redundant but perform slower.

So what does RAID stand for? Redundant Array of Independent Disks? Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks? Well, it doesn’t really matter. Different RAID setups can be fitting for different people’s needs. If you work in an environment where data loss is not an option, it is worthwhile to create more redundancy and sacrifice performance speed. If you are looking for storage and speed, it’s possible you can use a more performance speed based system.

You’ll want to do your homework before putting any type of RAID system together, but you can give us a call here at DriveFish and we will be glad to answer any questions you may have and help you construct a custom RAID setup suited to your needs.

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Solid State Drives and Digital Forensics

September 28th, 2012 No comments

Solid State Drives and Digital Forensics

What is a solid state drive?

We have discussed the basics about solid state drives (SSD) here at DriveFish before. While our traditional hard disk drives contain sensitive platters and many moving parts on the inside, modern solid state drives use integrates circuit assemblies to serve as memory and store data, eliminating the need for moving parts. Solid state drives have decreased in price significant and are becoming commonly used for their increased performance and reliability. At DriveFish we know all too well the problems sensitive moving parts within a hard drive can create and look forward to a more stable future for hard drive data storage.

How does digital evidence work with solid state drives?

One overlooked aspect of this transition is digital forensics, or the retrieval of digital evidence, which is a critical factor in many of today’s legal cases. While great deals of effort must be made to truly format a traditional hard disk drive, solid state drives make it much easier to remove data in a seemingly permanent fashion. It has many experts worried, with one quoted as saying, “It seems possible that the golden age for forensic recovery and analysis of deleted data and deleted metadata may now be ending.” Manufacturers are attempting to create solutions balancing the needs of law enforcement with the needs of security for any public or government entity, but the specific construction of solid state drives imposes some design limitations. As it stands, certain secure erase tools use encryption making it seemingly impossible to retrieve targeted files.

It will be interesting to observe the future of digital forensics with solid state drives.

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Is my data secure with DriveFish?

August 20th, 2012 No comments

To answer in a word: yes!

We completely understand hesitation in sending some of your most valuable personal data, we would do the same! And because of that, we treat every one of our customer’s data as priceless and incredibly sensitive, operating under a standard of non-disclosure. Our engineers only look at your data solely to confirm everything is valid, and beyond that consider it completely private.

This is our standard procedure, but if it makes you feel more comfortable, we are happy to offer a signed non-disclosure agreement. Our data recovery takes place in our offline, self-securing lab so there is no chance of your information ever leaking on to the Internet. We will keep your data for approximately 30 days after your recovery (to be sure you got everything you wanted), and then it will be digitally destroyed. The only bits of data that make it out of our lab are those that are delivered to you.

Of course you can feel free to call if you have further questions or concerns. While we can tell you all day about the security of our data recovery lab, sometimes it is much more comforting to hear someone’s voice. DriveFish’s friendly customer service representatives are happy to personally explain the process to you and discuss any other needs you may have that need to be accommodated.

Give us a call today!

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Solid State Drives vs. Hard Disk Drives

July 17th, 2012 No comments

You have probably heard people talk about solid state drives as being the way of the future, but what exactly is a solid-state drive?

First of all, let’s differentiate between what we mean by solid state compared to regular hard disk drives. If you take the case off a hard disk drive (WHICH YOU SHOULD NEVER DO!), it looks kind of like the arm of a record player reading a CD. The disk you see is the top stack of disks that contain all the data of your hard drive. Your family photos, work documents, music, all just little bits of information on these disks. For this information to be displayed on your computer, a little needle on the end of the arm must read the information off the spinning disks and then communicate it with your computer so it can be displayed or listened to or whatever the case may be. Hard disk drives have been the most dominant device for memory storage since their introduction. While most of the world’s data is still on hard disk drives, the complicated interaction between the actuator arm and disks can create speed and reliability problems that can be solved with new technology.

This new technology is currently being dominated by solid-state drives. So what does solid state mean? Remember how we said hard disk drives have an arm like a record player that reads data off spinning disks? Well solid-state drives have taken these moving parts out of the picture. They use the same type of block input/output system as traditional hard disk drives, but their lack of moving components makes them much less susceptible physical shock or lost data. They are also silent and have significantly lower access time and latency. The main holdup keeping solid-state drives being in everyone’s computers is they are currently significantly more expensive than hard-disk drives, and typically have less capacity. However, technology advances on solid-state drives is continuing to rapidly approach reasonable consumer costs and capacities which will allow solid-state drives to likely become the standard data storage method for personal computers over the next few years.

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