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Happy Backup Day!

June 10th, 2013

It is national backup day everyone. Is your data backed up? Recently? Good. We appreciate the opportunity to help our customers, but we would like to prevent you from having to need our data recovery services!

Do you have proper backup solutions? If you’d like to improve your backup solutions with a RAID or NAS setup or have questions about what kind of hard drive to buy, we’re happy to discuss the possibilities and answer any questions you may have. Send us an email or give us a call. We love to talk data recovery!

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives, Hardware

What Brand of Hard Drive Is Best?

May 15th, 2013

Another common question we get is, “what is the best brand of hard drive to buy?” Naturally people are frustrated that something just happened to their drive, and would like to know if purchasing another brand may be a solution to prevent the situation from occurring again.

We see all kinds of drives come in every day, and among the major brands of Western Digital, Toshiba, and Seagate, we haven’t found enough of a statistical difference in failure rates to be able to recommend any one over the others. Each brand does, however, offer different model levels, and it can be worthwhile to spring for the higher quality model as they are less likely to fail. It is also not necessary to buy a hard drive from one of these major brands. There are other hard drive manufacturers that make quality devices, but as with anything it is smart to do research. If you have any questions about hard drive backup or other data loss prevention tools such as RAID or NAS setups, feel free to contact us!

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives, Hardware

Why We Charge By Capacity

March 15th, 2013

We get a lot of calls asking about data recovery pricing. While we have the cheapest data recovery around, a very common question we get is, “do I have to pay the full price if I only want a small amount of files?” We do, and the reason for this is because the size of the disk often (though not always) determines the amount of time an engineer will have to spend recreating the disk image to obtain the data from. Some disks may come in with hardware or software problems, but even after fixing these problems the disk usually isn’t readable the way a properly working disk is. After fixing the initial problem, often times an image creating or scanning procedure is required, and the length of time this takes is based on the capacity of the disk. Furthermore, larger disk capacities have more room for something to go wrong. This is why our pricing reflects this extra time and resources, but we manage to do this and still keep the lowest data recovery prices in the industry.

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives

The Wild World of Cheap Data Recovery

January 24th, 2013

When DriveFish began providing cheap data recovery for a flat fee several years ago, there were very few if any other companies out there providing a similar service. Over the last few years, we have watched the industry grow as more companies attempt to provide cheap data recovery. But for a variety of reasons, DriveFish is still considered the best cheap data recovery, a title we are honored to have bestowed upon us.

With DriveFish, our recovery fees are some of the lowest in the industry and unlike some other cheap data recovery companies, we will never tell you one price and then give you another later. The prices listed on our website are a flat fee, and aside from target media and shipping, this is the ONLY cost you pay. No diagnosis or lab fee. No fee if we don’t recover the data you want. No extra fee for parts or because the drive ended up taking extra time. Just the simple flat fee based on the capacity of the hard drive. That’s all.

We also strive to continue providing the best customer service possible, and help you every way we can through your data recovery experience, which we know can be stressful and even frustrating with certain companies. Therefore we keep our model the same: to provide the best cheap data recovery with quality service and keep our customers happy.

It is this philosophy that has kept DriveFish number 1 in the cheap data recovery market for years now, and we plan to keep that position for many more.

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives, Misconceptions

What is a RAID setup?

October 25th, 2012

After experiencing a hard drive failure, many customers ask us about more reliable solutions of data storage. One of these possible solutions is a RAID setup, which stands for “redundant array of independent disks.” This method of data storage combines multiple disks into one unit, providing a level of redundancy to insure the safety of the data even in the case of failed disks. The term is now used for many types of data storage that replicates data on multiple physical drives, but accessed by a computer operating system as a single drive.

RAIDs can be set up under a number of different types of architecture, depending on whether the user is more interested in data integrity, speed, or capacity. These are designated with numbers such as RAID 0 or RAID 1, etc. RAID 0 for example is used more for performance. The data is split up amongst the drives but it does not provide redundancy and therefore any drive failure destroys the array. More drives in the array allow for greater bandwith but also a greater risk of data loss.

RAID 1 on the other hand writes data identically to two drives, making a “mirrored set.” This setup may not perform as fast as the RAID 0, but the mirror setup allows for the array to continue functioning in the case of one of the drives failing, making this a better setup for users less concerned with speed and more interested in the preservation of their data.

There are several more types of RAID setups. If you are interested in your own RAID setup or just have questions about the possibilities, give us a call here at DriveFish and we will be glad to explain more and create a customer RAID setup for your needs.

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives

Hardware and Software of Curiosity Mars Rover

August 14th, 2012

Hard drives hold some of the most valuable information to us, and most DriveFish customers can attest to how fragile they can be. So you can imagine a hard drive in a computer being sent to Mars would have to be able to withstand extreme conditions far beyond those of your average computer room.

First of all, everything has to stay working because there is obviously no one up there to fix it. Curiosity’s sensitive electronic parts must withstand the coldness of space, radiation extremes, impact events, electric overload, and the killer of many hard drives on Earth – dust. These elements are all present in extreme forms on Mars, a planet with very little atmosphere for protection compared to our home planet.

So with this in mind, it makes the hardware components of the on-board computer less to scoff at. The specifications are barely on par with decade old home computers, including a PowerPC 750 clocked around 200 MHz, and 256 MB of DRAM with 2 GB of flash storage to store video and data before being transmitted to Earth. But the full computer suite had to be specially designed to withstand the elements of space and the Martian surface.

What happens when the software needs to be upgraded? No problem, we’ll take care of it remotely! Yes, the software in Curiosity was upgraded after reaching the planet’s surface to be geared towards day to day activities on the red planet. So even if the computer in Curiosity doesn’t seem as top of the line as you might guess, it should be an understatement to say it is still an impressive feat of technology.

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Hard Drives, Hardware, Software

What Happened To Hard Drive Prices?

August 7th, 2012

If you have shopped for a hard drive in the last year, you have probably noticed a wild fluctuation in prices. What is going on here? Is someone trying to rip us off?

While many of the parts for drives are made around the region, most of the final assembly of hard drives is done in the country of Thailand. Flooding in Thailand prevented much of the factory labor from going to work, and hard drive prices went up accordingly. Many reputable internet hardware vendors such as NewEgg were selling hard drives for twice the cost they were prior to the flood. Computer providers such as Dell were actually shipping computers without hard drives, allowing the consumers to deal with the problem on their own.

Thankfully as of a few months ago, production got back to normal and prices started getting back down to their original value. Most stores now offer hard drives about the same cost they were prior to the flood. But even so, this is a lesson for all of us how a limited supply of a product like computer hard drives can have a worldwide effect on prices at the local level.

And don’t let anyone double charge you for a hard drive anymore! If you have questions about hard drives or current prices, contact DriveFish!

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Hard Drives

Retrieving Digital Information

July 17th, 2012

We are in the age where most of the world’s information is in digital form, all encoded as little 1′s and 0′s firing in circuit boards. So how much of this information ever makes it out of the digital world into our physical one? According to a recent study by UC Berkeley scientists, only about 7% of information in the digital world ever leaves. This means most of the world’s information exists solely in the digital realm.

Many people out there might like for this information to stay digital. Those who commit cyber-crimes use a number of methods to cover their traces, such as giving important files obscure names and moving them to a hard to find location. While this seems like an easy solution for digital investigators, time and legal restraints can make finding and extracting these files challenging.

A cyber criminal can simply change a file name or location or delete files. Deleted files can often be retrieved from the Recycle Bin, or if the Recycle Bin has been cleared, using other investigative methods. Even formatted drives can be recovered depending on the thoroughness with which the drive was formatted. It is important for investigators to pay attention to hidden and inaccessible files as these commonly contain useful evidence. When very determined, a criminal can physically destroy a drive, which if done successfully there can be no recourse for.

The digital realm is a vast one with lots of nooks and crannies for information to hide in, but computer security experts are tenacious and will always be trying to keep up with protection methods.

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives, Hardware, Prevention

My Hard Drive Is Making A Funny Noise

July 23rd, 2010

Don’t panic!

But also don’t power up your computer again!

Does this mean you have lost everything? Not necessarily!

We have discussed this in earlier blog posts as sometimes relating to a head crash. This is when the read/write heads literally strip the magnetic material off the platters of a drive, permanently taking the data with it.

However it is important to remember that a clicking drive does not always mean a head crash, as clicking can be caused by a number of other much less serious problems. It is very important to remember that when a disk clicks, you should never power the computer or drive up again, or you may cause permanent data loss!

The best idea is to send it to DriveFish for a free diagnosis. We know how important your data is to you, and we will always protect it and use the utmost care with your drive. If it does turn out your drive is suffering from a head crash, we will help you every step of the way in determining the best advanced recovery options if that is what you choose to do.

At DriveFish, we get personally invested in our customers and do everything we can to help get their data securely back to them.

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives, Hardware, Misconceptions , ,

Western Digital Data Recovery

March 26th, 2009

We offer data recovery on all types of hard drives including Western Digital.Western Digital Data Recovery

Western Digital, often referred to as WD,  has been making hard drives since the early 80′s and make good hard drives. Western Digital data recovery isn’t needed any more that any other brand of drive in our experience. We do have great experience with Western Digital (WD) drives because of how common they are in the marketplace.

If you have a Western Digital hard drive in need of data recovery simply fill out our easy web form and send us the disk. If you have a warranty situation we are happy to RMA the disk for you after recovery – just let us know what the RMA number is and pay shipping. Western Digital accepts drives directly from DriveFish and our labs do not invalidate any warranty so you can rest at ease.

Western Digital Data Recovery? Click here!

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Data Recovery, Hard Drives, Hardware , ,